Fava Beans and Greens

Fava beans, otherwise known as broad beans, are an ancient staple of the East African and Middle Eastern diet.  Dried broad beans have even been found in archaeological excavations here in Israel and in Egypt.  Fava beans, known in Arabic, as ful, are often served here as topping to hummus (Yes, have some beans on your beans. Sounds weird but it’s actually delicious).  They are high in protein and fiber and low in fat.  Because they have a high level of tyramine, they should be avoided by those taking MAOI’s but the rest of you can chow down!

Sometimes ful are brown, such as those in the popular Egyptian dish, ful medames, or flat and large with hard shells.  But these fava beans are young, green and shelled.  Here in Israel they are sold in the freezer case and look like this. If you do not have broad beans where you live, you could substitute lima beans, but shorten the cooking time.

ful 3

This recipe, which originally appears in Joan Nathan’s The Foods of Israel Today, calls for an indigenous wild green called milhouliya.  Not being entirely sure what that was, I decided to use kale.  Ms. Nathan also suggests Swiss chard as an option.  Use what you like. This dish is simple but absolutely delicious!

Fava Beans and Greens

Fava Beans and Greens

Ingredients

  • 800g shelled, green fava beans, fresh or frozen
  • 1 bunch of greens such as kale or Swiss chard
  • 3 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 3/4 cup water or broth
  • 1 handful fresh cilantro, chopped (cusbara)

Instructions

  1. Clean the greens and roughly chop or tear any large pieces.
  2. Place the fava beans in a pot with garlic, olive oil, lemon, salt, pepper, and water.
  3. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover and simmer for 10-15 minutes until the beans are tender.
  4. Add the greens and the cilantro and stir until the greens are wilted but still bright green.
  5. Serve hot or cold.
http://triumphwellness.com/fava-beans-and-greens/

All of my recipes for Vegan MoFo 2014 and 2013, can be found by clicking this link: MoFo Recipe Icon

 

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Sweet and Sour Vegan Meatballs

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 This is post #10, meaning we are halfway through Vegan MoFo 2014.  Thank the stars above!

This recipe incorporates my absolute favorite vegan “meatball” recipe with tomato sweet and sour sauce.  You can serve it as an appetizer (I am thinking 1 sauce-coated meatball on a toothpick with a pineapple chunk ala 1975, know what I’m talkin about?) or as a main dish, as I did, here with kasha (buckwheat) or rice, noodles, etc.  These would also be a terrific appetizer for an upcoming holiday meal.

The meatballs are made from mushrooms, walnuts, bread crumbs and spices and are in my regular rotation.  I like making meatball subs as in the original recipe which you can find HERE.  The meatballs themselves are sweet (although I cut the dates back to only 2 from 4 in the original recipe), so you do not need to add anything other than raisins to sweeten the sauce.  You could also add that iconic pineapple to give this that retro sweet and sour meatball taste!

Sweet and Sour Vegan Meatballs

Serving Size: 16 meatballs

Sweet and Sour Vegan Meatballs

Ingredients

    Meatballs
  • 1 cup walnuts
  • 1 package mushrooms
  • 1 tsp oregano
  • 4 sprigs fresh parsley
  • 2 dates, pitted
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 1 cup fresh breadcrumbs, made from 2 slices of any whole grain bread (or 1 cup ground oats)
  • 1 flax egg (1 Tbsp ground flax in 3 Tbsp water, mixed and set aside for 5 minutes)
  • Sauce
  • 1 400g jar of tomato sauce
  • juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 1/3 cup raisins
  • 1 tsp sweet paprika

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 200C.
  2. Lightly toast the bread in the toaster and let it cool.
  3. Finely grind the toast into crumbs in a food processor - transfer crumbs to a small bowl & set aside.
  4. In the food processor, finely grind 1 cup walnuts, half of the mushrooms, seasoning & parsley until well mixed. The mixture should be a bit moist from the walnuts.
  5. Transfer mixture to a medium mixing bowl.
  6. Add dates and remaining mushrooms to the processor until well ground.
  7. With a rubber spatula transfer date/mushroom mixture to the bowl with the walnut mixture.
  8. Add bread crumbs, olive oil, salt and flax egg - mix well.
  9. Using about 1 Tbsp of mixture, form into about 12 balls.
  10. Place on a parchment lined baking sheet.
  11. Bake for 15-20 minutes until brown.
  12. Sauce
  13. Mix all ingredients in a saucepan and heat over medium heat.
  14. Cook 10-15 minutes and taste. Adjust seasonings to suit your preferences.
  15. Gently stir in meatballs until coated.
  16. Serve.
http://triumphwellness.com/sweet-and-sour-vegan-meatballs/

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Frosty Mint Lemonade (Limonana Garoos)

I live in central, coastal Israel, a 20 minute drive from the Mediterranean Sea.  Every single day from May through October, the temperature outside at mid-day is exactly 30C (86F) and sunny.  Oh sure, occasionally it’s 33 or 34 and that’s called a heat wave.  When it drops to 27 it’s called unseasonably cool.  But the fact that there are people who actually go to school here for meteorology and then show up on the evening news every night as though they have something to actually report other than 30C and sunny, boggles my mind.

temps

 ANY time I look at it, this is what it shows.

I know that other parts of this tiny country have slightly different weather, and sometimes there is fog or variations in humidity levels, or even sand storms, but seriously, 6 months of the year are pretty much identical weather-wise.  Starting in November it begins to cool off a bit and by the end of that month it rains.  With the splash of those first heavy raindrops, you suddenly realize how glorious rain is.  You might even cry. You will definitely stop and stare.  If you are under 10, you’ll run outside and dance in it.  Judaism even has a prayer for the occasion of the first rain fall and Hebrew has a word for it. That very first rain of the year is called Yoreh and it is a deeply glorious moment, even more so I imagine for the thirsty plants!

But back to 30C and sunny:  I don’t know where the tradition of putting fresh mint and ice into lemonade and blending it all up began, but I do know that without a doubt it’s the coolest, most refreshing thing you could ever drink on a hot day.

limonana on the beach logo

 A typical Friday afternoon beach repast.  Pickled veggies in the foreground, beer and labaneh (a yogurt dip) for hubs, mint lemonade and hummus for me.

The good news is that you don’t have to go to the beach for Mint Lemonade, you can make it at home too no matter where you live or what the weather is there!

Note about the name:  Limonada is lemonade in Hebrew.  Nana is mint in Hebrew.  Therefore, limonana is the hybrid name for this concoction.  Garoos means ground up, as in the ice.  A limonana garoos then, is an icy, slushy minty lemonade.  Now, come visit and you can order it yourself!  I am saving you a beach chair…

Frosty Mint Lemonade (Limonana Garoos)

Serving Size: 2

Frosty Mint Lemonade (Limonana Garoos)

Ingredients

  • 2 standard ice cube trays of ice (about 2 cups ice)
  • 1 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice (about 4 lemons)
  • 1/2 cup fresh mint leaves
  • 4-6 Tbsp sugar or agave or you could even try dates or stevia if you are avoiding sugar

Instructions

  1. Put everything in a blender that can crush ice.
  2. Blend until bright green and frothy.
  3. L'chaim!
http://triumphwellness.com/frosty-mint-lemonade-limonana-garoos/

 

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Vegan Spanakopita with Nut Feta


spanikopita opener

Spanakopita is a Greek pie/casserole, made of phyllo dough layered with a spinach and feta filling.  In my vegan version, I have substituted my own nut cheese instead of the feta, and it tastes just as delicious.

A couple of words about phyllo:  First of all, don’t be scared of it.  Although it seems complicated, it is very forgiving.  You could have a total mess in the pan but when you bake it, all will come out just fine.  Secondly, traditionally, each phyllo sheet is brushed with butter or olive oil before layering the next sheet on top of it, and buttering again, and so on.  You do not need to oil every single sheet.  You can oil say every 2nd or 3rd sheet and when you do, you brush VERY, VERY lightly!  You do not need to have it dripping with grease (although that is undoubtedly tasty!).  If you’re a fan of oil spray, you can use that instead of brushing.  It’s all good.

I have simplified the nut cheese recipe here significantly, so although you should start it first, you can make this all one one day in just a couple of hours total time.  Just pay attention to the instructions on the phyllo you buy.  Most require an overnight thaw in the fridge and then a couple of hours on the counter to come to room temp.  Plan accordingly.

As for greens, I had one bunch of spinach and one bunch of kale.  Again, totally flexible.  You can use whatever you have and even try other vegetables to make a different sort of dish altogether.

I’m sure there is whole wheat phyllo.  I did not find any when I was shopping for this and didn’t have time for a separate health food store run.  Use whole wheat if you have it.  If not, use regular.  It will all be OK.

Vegan Spanakopita with Nut Feta

Vegan Spanakopita with Nut Feta

Ingredients

  • 1 box phyllo dough (contains 14 sheets)
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 2 large bunches spinach or other greens, chopped
  • 1 batch Nut Feta (see below)
  • olive oil for sauteing and brushing
  • 2 tsp dill, fresh or dried (optional)
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • Nut Feta
  • 1 1/2 cups cashews, almonds or walnuts or a mix thereof
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 3 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 1/2 tsp salt

Instructions

  1. Follow instructions on the phyllo package. Most require that you thaw in the refrigerator overnight and then on the counter for a few hours prior to using.
  2. Nut Feta
  3. If you have time, soak the nuts for a couple of hours in water. If not, proceed with step 4.
  4. Drain water off of soaked nuts and place in food processor.
  5. Preheat oven to 180C and oil a small casserole dish.
  6. Add all remaining cheese ingredients to food processor with nuts.
  7. Process until smooth.
  8. Plop into casserole dish and bake for 40 minutes until golden and firm.
  9. Set aside to cool while you prepare the rest of the dish.
  10. Spanakopita
  11. Preheat oven to 180C. (350F)
  12. Saute onions and garlic in a little oil until soft and beginning to caramelize (5-10 minutes)
  13. Add greens and cook until wilted
  14. Add dill, salt and pepper and adjust to your taste preference.
  15. Open phyllo package and lay the stack of sheets on the counter.
  16. Cover the phyllo with a clean kitchen towel whenever you are not using them. Work quickly so they won't dry out.
  17. Oil a large rectangular pan, the size of your sheets. Or line it with baking paper and oil the paper.
  18. Lay the first 7 sheets of phyllo in your pan, lightly brushing or spraying with oil between every 2nd or 3rd layer.
  19. Spread the greens evenly over the sheets.
  20. Crumble the nut cheese on top of the greens and spread evenly.
  21. Cover with remaining 7 sheets of phyllo, again brushing or spraying with oil between every 2nd or 3rd sheet.
  22. The top sheet should be brushed with oil.
  23. Place in 180C oven and bake for 30 minutes or until golden and puffed.
  24. Cut with a very sharp, serrated knife.
http://triumphwellness.com/vegan-spanakopita-with-nut-feta/

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Whole Wheat Vegan Blueberry Blintzes

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From probably the age of minus all numbers, I watched my mom do this graceful pan swirl of blintz batter in a perfectly oiled, perfectly heated pan, plopping perfect crepe after perfect crepe into an amazing, stove-side, fluffy pile.  But even Mom knew that the first few crepes would fail and be sacrificed into the waiting mouths of kitchen lurkers who also knew this fact.

The pan has to be the right temperature.  The pan has to be oiled just so lightly.  The batter has to be thin enough to swirl and spread before it sets.  Yes, a little fussy, but try it anyway.  Look on youtube for some pan swirling crepe techniques if you’ve never done it before.  Only by making a mess will you get better.  The first few are your practice runs.

Then there is the issue of veganizing a dish whose primary ingredient is eggs.  The first recipe I tried used good old chickpea flour and produced blintzes so heavy I almost broke the trash can when I flung them within.  They were inedible.  Frankly, if I never eat chickpea flour again, it will be too soon.  The Chickpea Flour Honeymoon is over.

Then I found a recipe with just whole wheat flour and no fancy veganizing tricks or waiting periods.  It worked fine although I did have to add more soy milk than the recipe called for to get the batter thin enough, and even then, they do lack the flexibility of crepes with eggs.  But they work, they taste great, my family gobbled them up and begged for more.

A couple of notes:  The batter calls for sugar, as does the filling.  You could definitely leave it out of the batter.  No reason the crepes need to be sweetened.  The filling will depend on the sweetness the fruit you are using.  I was thinking that you could also add a sweeter fruit such as dates, mango or banana if you wanted to avoid the sweetener issue altogether.  There is a large range of modifications that can be made as per your dietary preferences.  I’m sure you can use different flours as well, but I just used all-purpose whole wheat flour here.  Also I would stick with the soy milk or use coconut, but not the lower fat ones like rice or almond – I think you need the thickness and richness for these to work.

The original crepe recipe can be found HERE.

The filling recipe was adapted from this one.

Vegan Whole Wheat Blueberry Blintzes

Serving Size: makes 12 blintzes

Vegan Whole Wheat Blueberry Blintzes

Ingredients

    For crepes:
  • 1½ cups whole wheat flour
  • 3 Tbsp brown sugar, or maple syrup or silan (may be omitted for a non-sweet crepe)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1½ cups soy milk
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract (optional)
  • Blueberry Filling:
  • 1/4-1/3 cup sugar, agave, maple, whatever you prefer and depending on how sweet you like things (you could skip the sweetener and use a chopped banana, mango or dates, and/or stevia)
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon diced lemon zest (optional)
  • 3 cups blueberries, fresh or frozen
  • Additional oil for final frying if desired.
  • Vegan yogurt for topping (optional)

Instructions

    For filling:
  1. In a large saucepan, combine sugar, cinnamon, lemon zest (if using), and blueberries.
  2. Toss and place over medium heat.
  3. Allow it to come to a boil, reduce heat and simmer 2 minutes.
  4. Remove from heat.
  5. Adjust sweetness level to your taste.
  6. Set aside to cool as you make the crepes.
  7. For crepes:
  8. Mix all the ingredients in a bowl. Batter should be like a thin pancake batter so if needed, add a few more Tablespoons soy milk to reach the right consistency.
  9. Heat a lightly oiled frying pan over medium high heat.
  10. Pour 3 tablespoons of the batter in the pan, swirling the batter around to cover the whole bottom of the pan. (I hold it off the fire for this process).
  11. Cook for 1 or 2 minutes until the batter gets darker, loosen the edges with a spatula and gently flip the crepe.
  12. Cook one minute until brown the other side of the crepe.
  13. Remove to a plate and cover with a paper towel to prevent drying.
  14. Repeat with the rest of the batter.
  15. To assemble:
  16. Use a slotted spoon to place 1 tablespoon of berries (leave the sauce for garnish) on the lower third of the pancake.
  17. Fold the bottom up and away from you to cover the filling.
  18. Fold the two sides in toward the center.
  19. Roll the pancake away from you, ending with seam side down.
  20. Repeat with remaining pancakes and filling.
  21. Now, you can spoon the sauce on and eat your blintzes right now, OR you can do a second frying to seal and crisp them. Just be warned that because this batter is not so flexible, there is a chance they could fall apart. This happened to a few of mine.
  22. Add some more oil to your pan.
  23. Fry each side of the blintzes for about 2 minutes until crisp.
  24. Remove to a serving place, garnish with blueberry sauce and a dollop of vegan yogurt if desired.
  25. You can store these in the fridge for later serving, but the blue will stain through all of the crepe. It will be delicious, just very, very blue!
http://triumphwellness.com/whole-wheat-vegan-blueberry-blintzes/

 

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Vegan Mock Chopped Liver Spread

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photo credit: Ricki Heller

This recipe comes from the ebook I wrote a few years back, Vegan Jewish New Year Cookbook.  I still get email from people saying this is one their favorite recipes, so I decided to include it in our MoFo round-up this year.  In fact, vegan food blogger, Ricki Heller, reviewed a copy of my ebook and raved about this recipe in particular.  (That’s her photo above).  Ricki’s review is the only place where the download link for that ebook still exists.  I took it down from my own website as my business has moved in a different direction and the small stuff felt like clutter.  Now and then I still get an order for the ebook out of the blue which is kind of a fun surprise.  You can read Ricki’s review, see her amazing photos, and even purchase the ebook if you want to on her website HERE.

I know there are oodles of recipes for mock chopped liver out there.  Some use green beans, some use lentils, some use onions and walnuts.  But I decided to use ALL of the above, and not only that, but to ROAST the green beans and the onions (and the walnuts) in the oven to create a deeply rich and smoky flavor that the other versions often miss.

Does this taste like real chopped liver, you ask? Who knows?  Certainly not me! But it is really delicious, has no cholesterol, contains loads of healthy protein and fiber, AND doesn’t harm animals!  I think that makes it even better!

NOTE: I have noticed that here in Israel, the green beans are often hard and woody. If that’s all you can find, I suggest that you steam them for 5-10 minutes BEFORE oven-roasting them. The roasting gives a smoky flavor and brown color so don’t skip it. If your green beans are hard, they will not puree smooth in the food processor. If you have succulent, softer string beans, just roast, no need to steam first.

This chopped liver spread would taste delicious on my whole grain bagels

Vegan Chopped Liver Spread

Vegan Chopped Liver Spread

Ingredients

  • 1 cup dry brown lentils
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cube of mushroom bouillon OR 1 Tbsp dark miso
  • 500 g (1.1 lb. ) green beans, trimmed
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 3/4 cup walnuts
  • 2 large onions, thinly sliced (3 cups)

Instructions

  1. Rinse lentils and pick to make sure there are no rocks or dirt clumps masquerading as lentils.
  2. Bring lentils, bay leaf, bouillon if using, and 4 cups water to a boil in medium saucepan.
  3. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover partially, and simmer 30 minutes, or until lentils are tender.
  4. If using the miso, stir it in at the end of the cooking period in order to preserve its taste and nutritional benefits.
  5. Drain, and remove bay leaf. Transfer lentils to food processor.
  6. Preheat oven to 220C (400F).
  7. Toss green beans and onion slices with the oil on a baking sheet and season with remaining salt. Roast 10 minutes.
  8. Stir, then roast 15 minutes more, or until browned and soft.
  9. Leave the oven on to toast the nuts. Transfer the veggies to food processor.
  10. In the same pan you roasted the veggies, spread the walnuts and return to oven for 3 to 4 minutes, or until browned and fragrant. Watch carefully that they do not burn!
  11. Transfer to food processor.
  12. Process pâté mixture until coarsely chopped.
  13. Season with salt and pepper to taste, and transfer to serving bowl.
  14. Chill 2 hours or overnight before serving. This can be made up to 2 days ahead and actually gets better as it sits in the fridge.
http://triumphwellness.com/vegan-mock-chopped-liver-spread/

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Tunisian Pumpkin Salad

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I survived week one of Vegan MoFo 2014!!

Today’s recipe is adapted from Joan Nathan’s The Foods of Israel Today.  I like that cookbook.  There isn’t much in it’s that’s vegan but it’s got some great Jewish food history and reads like a novel on the culinary trends of the Holy Land.

Joan’s recipe was for mashed winter squash.  I decided to instead go with cubed, roasted pumpkin.  My husband declared it one of the best salads he’s ever eaten.

Here in Israel it’s common to buy a slab of pumpkin that’s been whacked off of an enormous white-fleshed pumpkin.  And I mean, ENORMOUS!  If you live in a country where pumpkin comes in a can or as a Halloween decoration, I’d suggest using butternut squash instead.

Tunisian Pumpkin Salad

Tunisian Pumpkin Salad

Ingredients

  • 500g pumpkin or butternut squash
  • 1/2 tsp sweet paprika
  • 2 cloves garlic, pressed
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp sugar, maple, agave, silan whatever you prefer
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • juice of 1 lemon

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 200C.
  2. Peel and cube the pumpkin into bite-sized squares.
  3. Toss in the oil and spread in a single layer on a baking sheet.
  4. Roast for 30-40 minutes or until lightly browned and soft enough to eat.
  5. Remove from oven and toss with remaining ingredients.
  6. Sprinkle with additional sweet paprika if desired.
  7. Serve hot, room temperature, or cold.
http://triumphwellness.com/tunisian-pumpkin-salad/

 

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Zucchini Koftas with Coconut Curry Sauce

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Day Four

 

Although this recipe is more Far East than Middle East, koftas themselves definitely appear frequently in Middle Eastern cuisine.  Usually made out of lamb or beef combined with a grain such as rice or bulgur and veggies, you could say they are a cross between a meatball and a fritter.

This particular recipe, which I found HERE, is made of zucchini and potato koftas that are fried and then cooked in a coconut curry sauce.  This is NOT a low-fat recipe!  But it’s a delicious one for a special occasion.  My husband totally flipped over this dish, raving on and on about how delicious this “MooFoo” was.  (He doesn’t read my blog and although has heard me talking about Vegan MoFo, doesn’t really have any idea what’s going on – just that there is even more food than usual!)

I made several changes to the original recipe, especially in quantities, but also in that the original states that the koftas should cook IN the sauce.  I did that and most of them just fell apart.  That was tasty too, but sort of defeated the purpose of all the separate shaping and frying.  I’m suggesting here that you serve the sauce OVER the cooked koftas instead of submerging them.

Zucchini Koftas with Coconut Curry Sauce

Zucchini Koftas with Coconut Curry Sauce

Ingredients

    For the Koftas
  • 800g zucchini (about 4 large zucchini)
  • 500g potatoes (about 5 medium potatoes)
  • 5 green onions, chopped
  • 4 Tbsp chickpea flour
  • 3 Tbsp rice flour
  • 1 Tbsp garam masala
  • 1 large handful cilantro leaves, minced
  • 1 hot green chile pepper
  • 1/2 tsp cumin
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • oil for frying
  • For the Sauce
  • 1 Tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 Tbsp fresh ginger, minced
  • 5 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • 2 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 300 g tomatoes, chopped (or canned chopped tomatoes)
  • 200ml canned coconut milk (can use "lite" if you wish)
  • juice of 1 lime (optional)
  • chopped cilantro or parsley for garnish (optional)

Instructions

    For the koftas:
  1. Peel the potatoes and boil them until soft.
  2. Drain the potatoes, put in a bowl and mash.
  3. Grate zucchini and add to potatoes.
  4. Squeeze handfuls of the zucchini-potato mixture in your hands, squeezing out as much water as possible.
  5. Add all remaining ingredients and mix thoroughly.
  6. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  7. Heat oil in a frying pan and fry on both side until golden. (You could probably bake them if you are more virtuous than I)
  8. Set them aside while you prepare the sauce.
  9. For the sauce:
  10. Warm the oil in a saucepan.
  11. Stir in the garlic, the ginger and the dry spices.
  12. Cook 1 minute or so until fragrant. Do not burn!
  13. Add in tomatoes, bring to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes or so adding water if needed to keep from burning.
  14. With an immersion blender, puree the tomato sauce.
  15. Stir in the coconut milk and the lime juice.
  16. Cook for a few minutes to heat.
  17. Serve hot sauce over koftas. Top with chopped cilantro or parsley as desired.
  18. I suggest you serve it all with rice or couscous to soak up all that delicious, rich sauce.
http://triumphwellness.com/zucchini-koftas-with-coconut-curry-sauce/

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Whole-Grain Vegan Bagels

vegan bagels 8

As I told you before we began, in a blogging challenge like this, there is no time for recipe testing and perfecting. Whatever happens is what I post.  Therefore I must admit here that although these bagels are delicious, and the kids asked that they please go into regular rotation, the truth is they were flatter than I’d like a bagel to be and I’m not sure why.  I’m not a great bread maker, but I’m thinking maybe I should use a high-gluten bread flour?  If any of you have tips or ideas, please leave in the comments.

So a little flat, but definitely easy and delicious.  The original recipe comes from a 1983 cookbook called The Romantic Vegetarian by Judith Sharlin.  It’s an adorable, themed cookbook, all handwritten and illustrated.  I don’t use it much anymore because the recipes have a lot of dairy and eggs in them, but this bagel recipe was vegan except for the egg white wash.  For that I looked to Isa Chandra Moskovitz’s vegan challah recipe which suggests a maple syrup/soy milk wash to add browning and shine to the loaves.  It worked well for the bagels too but did add a little sweetness.  I thought that was nice, but if you don’t like that idea, you’ll have to find a different solution.

A funny thing about bagels – they aren’t really commonly sold or eaten here in Israel.  Isn’t that strange?  I was pretty shocked when we moved to the land of the Jews and the most iconic Jewish food is nowhere to be found.  Oh, there are a few bagel shops in the areas with larger Anglo populations and you can buy them frozen at the grocery store, but they are not a daily staple as they were in my American life.

The word “beigele” in Hebrew actually means pretzel – both the little hard snack pretzels and the huge, rope-like, sesame encrusted loaves sold by Arab vendors.  Apparently the boiled then baked chewy bagels we know and love were brought to North America by Polish Jews.  I guess the Poles who emigrated to Israel decided to just convert to pita.

As any bread, these bagels have a lot of steps, but there is nothing complicated or difficult so don’t that let that stop you from trying them!

Whole-Grain Vegan Bagels

Serving Size: 8 bagels

Ingredients

  • 2 Tbsp dry yeast
  • 1 1/2 cups wrist-warm water
  • 3 Tbsp sugar or sweetener of your choice (plus an additional Tbsp for the boiling water)
  • 1 Tbsp salt
  • 2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1 3/4 - 2 cups white flour, plus possibly more for kneading
  • cornmeal for baking sheet
  • For wash and topping
  • 2 Tbsp maple syrup
  • 2 Tbsp soy milk
  • sesame seeds, poppy seeds, onion or garlic powder etc for sprinkling on top as desired

Instructions

  1. Put the yeast and the sugar in a large bowl.
  2. Stir in the wrist-warm water until dissolved.
  3. Let rest for 5 minutes to foam up.
  4. Add flour 1 cup at a time and salt as well.
  5. At some point the dough will become too stiff to stir with a spoon and then you will turn it out onto the counter to knead.
  6. Knead the dough for about 10 minutes, adding small amounts of flour as needed to keep it from sticking.
  7. You will know you have kneaded the dough enough and added the right amount of flour when it feels like a soft, smooth ear lobe, with no remaining stickiness.
  8. Wash the bowl you originally used. Dry it and wipe it with some oil.
  9. Place the dough in the bowl and coat all sides with oil.
  10. Cover the bowl tightly with plastic wrap, and then a kitchen towel, and set in a warm place to rise for 1 hour.
  11. After one hour, punch the dough down and divide into 8 balls.
  12. Using your thumb, make a hole in the middle of each ball and set on a sheet of plastic wrap or waxed paper.
  13. Let the rings rest and rise for another 10 minutes or so while you prepare the pot of water.
  14. Place 3 liters (about 12 cups) of water in a large pot and stir in 1 Tbsp sugar. Bring to a boil.
  15. Meanwhile, preheat your oven to 180C.
  16. Line 2 baking sheets with baking paper, lightly oil them, and sprinkle with cornmeal. Set aside.
  17. When the water is boiling vigorously, gently side in a few bagels at a time.
  18. Boil bagels for about 45 seconds - 1 minute until they expand.
  19. Gently remove bagels with a slotted spoon and place on a smooth kitchen towel to drain while you boil the next batch. (Mine totally stuck to the paper towel I used. Don't use paper towel!)
  20. When you have boiled all the bagels, place them on the prepared baking sheets and brush lightly with the maple syrup/soy milk mixture.
  21. Sprinkle with whatever seeds or toppings you have chosen, or leave plain.
  22. Place in the preheated oven for 15 - 20 minutes until browned and firm.
  23. Remove, slice, shmear, and eat!
http://triumphwellness.com/whole-grain-vegan-bagels/

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Vegan Tuna and Egg Salads

vegan egg and tuna 1

Can I just point out, that like yesterday, when I gave you TWO recipes for the price of ONE (shawarma seitan and spiced mashed potatoes), today I am giving two recipes as well.  I hope you will look upon me kindly when we get to the end of the month, I am burned out and behind, and am putting up recipes for things like toast, and tea.

Day Two and we’re headed out of the Middle East and westward ho into American Jewish territory. Egg and tuna salad on bagels, baby!  I don’t miss very many dishes since becoming vegan in 2009, but the whole egg and tuna salad on bagels thing was a comfort food combo that I did often pine for, especially breaking the fast on Yom Kippur.  So I am delighted to finally be able to recreate it for my break-fast this year.  The yummy and easy bagel recipe will be up tomorrow, stayed tuned.  I also have a chopped liver spread recipe that goes well with the “bagel and a shmear” category.  I’ll blog that one too.

Both of today’s recipes were inspired by The Happy Herbiviore’s.  I used those as my starting place and then did my usual thang to them.  Honestly I was afraid of the egg salad as it uses uncooked tofu and I thought that would be gross.  So I only made half a recipe and then it was so good that I ate it all and had to make more.  Then the tuna salad, which I thought I would love, ended up being kind of meh.  It was saved the following day when it became a tuna melt.  More on that below…

Both salads call for sweet pickle relish which I’m sure you can find here somewhere, but rather than hunt it down, I just chopped up a regular pickle, added some sugar and some vinegar and bam, close enough.  You can play with the amounts of sweetener and vinegar to suit your taste buds.  I like things to be strongly flavored.

The tuna salad also calls for kelp granules which I order from vitacost.  I actually use it regularly as a salt-like seasoning, as it contains iodine, which is one of the important nutrients that can come up short on a vegan diet.  If you don’t have any, I imagine you could crumble some nori sheets or some dried kelp – both available at most health food stores or the Asian section of most grocery stores.  Or you could leave it out, but then you won’t have a fishy sort of taste to your tuna.

Vegan Tuna and Egg Salads

Vegan Tuna and Egg Salads

Ingredients

    For Egg Salad
  • 1 block (300g) firm tofu
  • 2 stalks celery, minced
  • 2 Tbsp pickle relish (OR 2 minced pickles + 2 tsp sugar + 2 tsp apple cider vinegar)
  • 1 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 2 Tbsp nutritional yeast
  • 2 Tbsp dijon mustard
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1/4 tsp curry powder
  • 1/4 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/4 tsp onion powder
  • 1/2 tsp black salt (can use regular, but black salt has a slightly sulfurous taste, similar to eggs)
  • 2-3 Tbsp vegan mayonnaise
  • For Tuna Salad
  • 1 can (560g) chickpeas, drained
  • 2 celery stalks, minced
  • 2 Tbsp pickle relish (OR 2 minced pickles + 2 tsp sugar + 2 tsp apple cider vinegar)
  • 1/2 tsp onion flakes
  • 1-2 Tbsp nutritional yeast
  • 1 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 Tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • 3 tsp granulated kelp (or crumbled nori or kelp)
  • 1 Tbsp dried dill
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 2-3 Tbsp vegan mayonnaise

Instructions

    For Egg Salad
  1. Chop the tofu into small squares.
  2. Mix with all other ingredients.
  3. Adjust seasonings to your taste.
  4. For the Tuna Salad
  5. Mash the chickpeas with a potato masher or fork
  6. Mix in remaining ingredients.
  7. Adjust seasonings to your taste
http://triumphwellness.com/vegan-tuna-and-egg-salads/

As mentioned above, the next day I made a tuna melt by spreading 1/4 cup of the tuna salad on a slice of bread, topping it with a slice of vegan cheese and broiling until the cheese melted. It was fabulous!

vegan tuna melt

 

And because I know you are going to ask, the brand of Vegan Cheese I used is called Violife and it is made in Greece.  They make it from coconut oil rather than soy and I think it really tastes pretty good.  There are many flavors, the above one is tomato-basil, my favorite.  For local peeps, I buy it at Shufersol and the package looks like this:

vegan cheese

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